kkhendin

kkhendin:

This post isn’t about me. It’s about my friends who are having anxiety attacks because of piracy. Friends who are thinking of quitting because the piracy is out of control. Friends who depend on book sales to have a roof over their head and food on their tables. Friends who wish they could depend on books to give them a roof over their head and food on their tables. It could be friends who self-published, or friends who are traditionally published. It doesn’t matter.

I hate piracy with a thriving passion. So much so I did all the math (which I also hate), to show you the breakdown of time and energy spent, and the cost of stealing. The numbers used in terms of hours spent is very very very low, and in reality, the number is probably double that. And still.

Please share this post. But mostly, please don’t steal books.

These are some heroic maths.

No, nobody’s saying anyone should stop reading.
There are many ways to get free books.
http://www.gutenberg.org/
Thousands of books that are out of copyright, their authors dead and unable to be hurt. Jane Austen, William Thackeray, Anthony Trollope, to name three I love. If you like horror, there’s Dracula and Carmilla.
If you like fantasy, I really recommend George MacDonald Fraser’s ‘The Princess and the Goblin.’ http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/34339
There’s fanfiction. Tons of great fanfiction out there for free.
There are discounted ebooks, and sometimes ebooks given away for free, for certain periods of time, to look out for.
Used books are much cheaper than new—and used books are different from piracy, as it’s a copy that was bought by someone, who then could do whatever they will with that one copy. I am not sure of your situation, but in some places books are set out on stoops to be taken away, books available on lending systems in bars and coffee shops, books available outside used bookshops with tip jars. Many authors and book blogs offer free copies, and you can enter as many of those draws as you want.
There are online book borrowing chains, like http://bookmooch.com/ - if people can afford postage, that’s a great way to get books.
There are many, many authors who write free things you can read legally. They write things for free, hoping that readers might want to buy some of their stuff that’s for sale—but also just wanting to share their writing, and hoping people enjoy.
Seanan McGuire’s shorts, many of which are free:
http://seananmcguire.com/icshorts.php
http://seananmcguire.com/velhome.php
http://seananmcguire.com/tobyshorts.php
Also short stories on her livejournal: http://seanan-mcguire.livejournal.com/351126.html
Short stories by Kelley Armstrong, who has also written a lot:
http://www.darkestpowers.com/category/short-stories/
http://www.kelleyarmstrong.com/free-online-fiction/
Ilona Andrews, whose books I love:
http://www.ilona-andrews.com/books/ebooks/curran-volume-1
http://www.ilona-andrews.com/books/ebooks/curran-vol-ii-fathers-and-sons
I myself have written huge amounts of free stuff online myself. Feel free to read it! Please make yourself free of it and enjoy.
http://sarahreesbrennan.com/extras/
The Turn of the Story: http://sarahtales.livejournal.com/209287.html
For those who say they want to try before they buy—there are lots of ways to try out a writer without piracy.
And there are authors who are going to say: yes, okay to piracy. Neil Gaiman apparently is one. Cory Doctorow is another famous example, and provides free copies of his own work. (Men’s work is always valued more than women’s work, and I would be surprised if more people didn’t come back and buy a guy’s book after they got it for free, because the guy ‘deserved’ it—so I am not surprised by seeing more guy authors having a more relaxed attitude. Similarly, I doubt all that many guys have been scolded and told they should feel lucky that anyone’s paying attention to them if they are against book piracy.)
It sucks not being able to have the specific book you want, of course. Yesterday I was having a tantrum on twitter because I want Courtney Milan’s The Heiress Effect, and my ereader store (Sony) doesn’t have it yet. I want it! But I can’t have it. Same thing happened with A Kiss For Midwinter—eventually it came in, and I bought it. I want it, and I want it now—and I can’t have it now. That sucks. But I don’t intend to punish Courtney Milan for that. I will wait, and buy it when I can.
It sucks to be in a country where you can’t buy books. I wish there was a system in place to make regional ebooks a thing of the past—I hope it’s something that will happen in the future.
It sucks to not have enough money to buy a book. (Though there are different versions of ‘I can’t afford.’ I admit, it stings and is horrible to be told ‘I couldn’t afford your book’ by someone who means ‘I wished to spend the money on something else instead, like this fancy belt, and have BOTH things, and I didn’t care about the effect it had on anyone but me.’ It’s quite different to ‘It’s the choice between your book and dinner’—of course dinner should win.)
I don’t like piracy, but I understand there are reasons to pirate—but I also think that it should be borne in mind that piracy can hurt authors, and that authors are people. It can hurt libraries, which hurts people who are very badly off. It can hurt bookshops, which hurts people’s chances of discovering new books to love, or a love for books at all. It can hurt readers, if a favourite author’s books aren’t published anymore and they never get to read new books from them.
I think that it’s good to remind people of that, so they can consider if they do really need to pirate books.
And if they feel that they truly don’t have another way to get the books and the books would be a huge comfort to them, I think it’s good to know that piracy hurts authors so later, if people are in a different position, they can remember to buy the books. (Worth noting: remember that authors who don’t sell are often let go by their old publishers and have to (if they’re lucky), find new ones, so buy the newer books by the new publishers if you can.)
Remember, too, that piracy affects libraries, and libraries are vitally important to people who cannot afford luxury items like computers and ereaders—who are in a worse position than most.
http://seanan-mcguire.livejournal.com/390067.html
I know that I am lucky: lucky to have the job I have, for however long it lasts, and lucky in that while I been in the position where I skipped a meal in order to buy a book, I am no longer in that position, and have never been in a position where I would have had to skip several meals: where I was facing real privation.
I know this stuff is complicated.
http://terribleminds.com/ramble/2013/02/05/25-thoughts-on-book-piracy/
And I know it sucks. But I think there should be awareness that authors are people, and people who are harmed, and dropped by their publishers, and also emotionally upset, by this stuff.
Quoting Seanan McGuire again (sorry Seanan! It’s been a Seanan-With-Seanan-On-Top Day!) 
‘It is absolutely complicated… That’s also why it was “please don’t pirate,” not “if you pirate you are scum and I hate you and you can never never never be a true fan, ever.”

Part of the problem for me, as a creator, is that the more we-as-people become distanced from the work—the more the work is viewed as this amorphous “thing” that just sprung into being without human intervention, but which pays THE MAN in royalties when you buy it—the easier it is to not stop and think “okay, did I love this enough to pay for it? Did I love this enough to pay for something else by the same person?” And that’s part of why we keep talking about it. We need to remain part of the conversation, with our mortgages and our hungry cats, or we’re in even more trouble than we already are.’

No, nobody’s saying anyone should stop reading.

There are many ways to get free books.

http://www.gutenberg.org/

Thousands of books that are out of copyright, their authors dead and unable to be hurt. Jane Austen, William Thackeray, Anthony Trollope, to name three I love. If you like horror, there’s Dracula and Carmilla.

If you like fantasy, I really recommend George MacDonald Fraser’s ‘The Princess and the Goblin.’ http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/34339

There’s fanfiction. Tons of great fanfiction out there for free.

There are discounted ebooks, and sometimes ebooks given away for free, for certain periods of time, to look out for.

Used books are much cheaper than new—and used books are different from piracy, as it’s a copy that was bought by someone, who then could do whatever they will with that one copy. I am not sure of your situation, but in some places books are set out on stoops to be taken away, books available on lending systems in bars and coffee shops, books available outside used bookshops with tip jars. Many authors and book blogs offer free copies, and you can enter as many of those draws as you want.

There are online book borrowing chains, like http://bookmooch.com/ - if people can afford postage, that’s a great way to get books.

There are many, many authors who write free things you can read legally. They write things for free, hoping that readers might want to buy some of their stuff that’s for sale—but also just wanting to share their writing, and hoping people enjoy.

Seanan McGuire’s shorts, many of which are free:

http://seananmcguire.com/icshorts.php

http://seananmcguire.com/velhome.php

http://seananmcguire.com/tobyshorts.php

Also short stories on her livejournal: http://seanan-mcguire.livejournal.com/351126.html

Short stories by Kelley Armstrong, who has also written a lot:

http://www.darkestpowers.com/category/short-stories/

http://www.kelleyarmstrong.com/free-online-fiction/

Ilona Andrews, whose books I love:

http://www.ilona-andrews.com/books/ebooks/curran-volume-1

http://www.ilona-andrews.com/books/ebooks/curran-vol-ii-fathers-and-sons

I myself have written huge amounts of free stuff online myself. Feel free to read it! Please make yourself free of it and enjoy.

http://sarahreesbrennan.com/extras/

The Turn of the Story: http://sarahtales.livejournal.com/209287.html

For those who say they want to try before they buy—there are lots of ways to try out a writer without piracy.

And there are authors who are going to say: yes, okay to piracy. Neil Gaiman apparently is one. Cory Doctorow is another famous example, and provides free copies of his own work. (Men’s work is always valued more than women’s work, and I would be surprised if more people didn’t come back and buy a guy’s book after they got it for free, because the guy ‘deserved’ it—so I am not surprised by seeing more guy authors having a more relaxed attitude. Similarly, I doubt all that many guys have been scolded and told they should feel lucky that anyone’s paying attention to them if they are against book piracy.)

It sucks not being able to have the specific book you want, of course. Yesterday I was having a tantrum on twitter because I want Courtney Milan’s The Heiress Effect, and my ereader store (Sony) doesn’t have it yet. I want it! But I can’t have it. Same thing happened with A Kiss For Midwinter—eventually it came in, and I bought it. I want it, and I want it now—and I can’t have it now. That sucks. But I don’t intend to punish Courtney Milan for that. I will wait, and buy it when I can.

It sucks to be in a country where you can’t buy books. I wish there was a system in place to make regional ebooks a thing of the past—I hope it’s something that will happen in the future.

It sucks to not have enough money to buy a book. (Though there are different versions of ‘I can’t afford.’ I admit, it stings and is horrible to be told ‘I couldn’t afford your book’ by someone who means ‘I wished to spend the money on something else instead, like this fancy belt, and have BOTH things, and I didn’t care about the effect it had on anyone but me.’ It’s quite different to ‘It’s the choice between your book and dinner’—of course dinner should win.)

I don’t like piracy, but I understand there are reasons to pirate—but I also think that it should be borne in mind that piracy can hurt authors, and that authors are people. It can hurt libraries, which hurts people who are very badly off. It can hurt bookshops, which hurts people’s chances of discovering new books to love, or a love for books at all. It can hurt readers, if a favourite author’s books aren’t published anymore and they never get to read new books from them.

I think that it’s good to remind people of that, so they can consider if they do really need to pirate books.

And if they feel that they truly don’t have another way to get the books and the books would be a huge comfort to them, I think it’s good to know that piracy hurts authors so later, if people are in a different position, they can remember to buy the books. (Worth noting: remember that authors who don’t sell are often let go by their old publishers and have to (if they’re lucky), find new ones, so buy the newer books by the new publishers if you can.)

Remember, too, that piracy affects libraries, and libraries are vitally important to people who cannot afford luxury items like computers and ereaders—who are in a worse position than most.

http://seanan-mcguire.livejournal.com/390067.html

I know that I am lucky: lucky to have the job I have, for however long it lasts, and lucky in that while I been in the position where I skipped a meal in order to buy a book, I am no longer in that position, and have never been in a position where I would have had to skip several meals: where I was facing real privation.

I know this stuff is complicated.

http://terribleminds.com/ramble/2013/02/05/25-thoughts-on-book-piracy/

And I know it sucks. But I think there should be awareness that authors are people, and people who are harmed, and dropped by their publishers, and also emotionally upset, by this stuff.

Quoting Seanan McGuire again (sorry Seanan! It’s been a Seanan-With-Seanan-On-Top Day!) 

It is absolutely complicated… That’s also why it was “please don’t pirate,” not “if you pirate you are scum and I hate you and you can never never never be a true fan, ever.”

Part of the problem for me, as a creator, is that the more we-as-people become distanced from the work—the more the work is viewed as this amorphous “thing” that just sprung into being without human intervention, but which pays THE MAN in royalties when you buy it—the easier it is to not stop and think “okay, did I love this enough to pay for it? Did I love this enough to pay for something else by the same person?” And that’s part of why we keep talking about it. We need to remain part of the conversation, with our mortgages and our hungry cats, or we’re in even more trouble than we already are.

Saw A Piracy Post On My Dash

I took a break from the fifty million things I have to do today (organise promotion, write up promotion, edit my book, edit an essay, panic and panic some more) and saw a list of pirated links to books (not mine) on my dashboard and had to take a break and take deep breaths.

So look, here’s the thing. I don’t live in the US. I know it really sucks to not be able to get the book you want in the format you want: I wish the distribution models were better. I wish there were more libraries and e-libraries. I wish things were better.

But please: there are secondhand books (someone already bought the book), there are libraries (take a book out and libraries will buy more books: go to a library and you will help the libraries continue to exist for other readers). I know the system’s not perfect, but there are alternatives.

Readers are hurt by writers’ books not being available in print: it sucks to not be able to afford a book in any form, but it sucks much worse for people (often kids) with no computers, internet connections or ereaders. This is explained much better than I can here: http://seanan-mcguire.livejournal.com/390067.html

Generally readers are hurt because writers whose books don’t have great sales records have their contracts cancelled, so no more of the books they like in any form.

And of course writers are hurt by that, too. I’m a writer: I cannot pretend to be objective. I know a book is just a Thing You’d Like, but it is a thing created by a real person, with considerable effort.

I write a lot of free content—I’m happy for people to have that. But I also write, hoping to be paid for some of the work I do. Writers don’t make much money, exceptions like E.L. James and Stephenie Meyer aside. Writers tend to be just getting by, having other jobs as well, really, really trying to make it work—so they can share their books with people, so they can *keep* sharing their books with people.

I know I am very lucky to have the job I have, for however long I may have it (and it may not be very long: it may end this year). Writing a book is wonderful, it’s glorious, it makes me happy and I’d do it anyway, of course I would. But would I work until I cried over promotion? Would I stay up for three nights without sleep until I made myself sick to get something done, if it was just for me, if I wasn’t trying to make a career of this? I wouldn’t. It is so much work.

Please don’t take my work against my will, in a way that hurts me. Please don’t take anyone’s work against their will, in a way that hurts them.