September 5, 2014

Anonymous said: Ms. Bardugo, I loved your first books, but I was terribly disappointed to see you give in to political correctness in Ruin & Rising. You had a great story and then you ruined it with unnecessary lesbianism. Authors don't need to make statements, they just need to write good books. I hope you'll remember that in the future.

lbardugo:

I was really tempted to ignore this because I don’t believe in giving anon wangs a platform, but the term “unnecessary lesbianism” made me laugh so hard that I caved.

Authors can write good books and make statements. I’m going to make some statements now. (Get ready.)

Queer people and queer relationships aren’t less necessary to narrative than cishet people or relationships. In fact, given the lovely emails and messages I’ve received about Tamar and Nadia (and given the existence of anon wangs like you), I’d say making queer relationships visible in young adult fiction is an excellent—and yes, necessary—idea.

I do agree that story trumps statement or we’d all just write angry pamphlets, but queer people exist both in my world and the world of the Grisha trilogy. I don’t see how including them in my work is making a statement unless that statement is “I won’t willfully ignore or exclude people in order to make a few anon wangs happy.” If that’s the statement I’m making, I’m totally down with it.

Also, I’m going to take this moment to shout out Malinda Lo, Laura Lam, Alex London, David Levithan, Emily Danforth, Emma Trevayne, Sarah Rees Brennan, Maureen Johnson, and Cassandra Clare, and to link to Malinda’s 2013 guide to LGBT in YA.  Because why just give attention to bigots when you can talk about awesome books and authors instead?

Quick question to the general populace: who wants to join my band Unnecessary Lesbianism? I only play the triangle, but I know we’re going to make it big.

Isn’t this lovely. I’m really honoured to be on Leigh’s list which has all authors I love and respect (as I do Leigh herself). I was just reading an interview with David Levithan, who has helped change the face of children’s publishing, and he talked about this very thing and listed several authors he loves and admires too: 

http://news.yahoo.com/writer-david-levithan-lgbt-books-young-120410661.html

I think, while there is still a long way to go, that it is really beautiful we can talk about this, and celebrate it, and have a lot of authors and books to talk about, and come together in love and respect and hope for a changing world despite, you know, the absolute raving bags of seagull poop who talk of writing about love as ‘scandalous’ ‘for sales’ ‘to make a statement’ ‘to be politically correct’ or whatever other absolute obvious nonsense they talk about to disguise the fact that the hatred in their own hearts makes them uncomfortable and they just want the discomfort to go awwwwwwway.

Quick question to the anon: how on earth does two people loving each other make a book ‘not good’? How and why does it *ruin* a book for you? And if it does… the whole world is full of so many different loves. If it does, the whole world is going to be ruined for you. Unless you change. I hope you do, because until you do, it’s not the world that’s rotten and twisted: it’s you. Not the world, not stories, not authors, not characters, certainly not love, but you, you, you.

I hope you’ll remember that in the future.

August 13, 2014
hollyblack:

ivegotthekittens:

malindalo:

From today on Twitter: I often see “I wish [bestselling writer] would include POC/LGBT characters!” But There are other writers who do this. Support them.

So, you’re suggesting I read books by authors I do not like, and/or that deals with subjects I am not interested in, simply because it has a PoC/LGBT character? 
I wish certain authors would have diverse characters because these are the ones writing books I’m actually going to read. 
And I wish bestselling artists would because no matter what their next book going to be about, it would get many readers and a lot of publicity. 
Can you imagine what it would have been like for PoC and LGBT to have their group represented as one of the trio in Harry Potter? Or even just make Dumbledore openly and obviously gay? 
This is what we need. It’s not that the public isn’t aware such people exists, but they are never in the mainstream media. Correct me if I’m wrong, but seems to me this is what all those PoC justice posts are preaching. 
And best selling authors are the main streams of books, so we want them to include these characters. 

Seriously? Do you honestly believe that bestselling books are anointed and raised up by some divine hand? Like THE CLAW HAS CHOSEN? And for some reason the claw keeps choosing straight white cisgendered protagonists written by straight white cisgendered authors? REALLY?
Best selling authors don’t just HAPPEN to be in the mainstream media. Selling a lot of books MAKES someone a bestselling author and GETS mainstream media attention. But books are sold one at a time to readers who make choices about which books they want to support.
If you want more diversity, you have to buy more diversely.
And, look, I love me and I want everyone to read all my books all the time, but reading a book with a diverse cast written by JK Rowling or myself or any other white straight cisgendered writer isn’t the same as reading a book written by a person of color or a LGBTQ+ writer. It’s the difference between a secondary source and a primary source. But if you feel that FOR SOME REASON you can be absolutely sure that you’re not going to like a book you haven’t read because it isn’t already a bestseller, then I guess that’s you, but please, please, please don’t act like it’s some kind of positive political act.
And don’t you dare talk that way to Malinda.
 

I agree with everything Holly has said above and I admire that she said it without using the many expletives that came to my mind.
I see a lot of people watching shows/movies without diversity, reading books without diversity, and then asking for diversity in those books or those shows or those movies… 
You know, asking for diversity from creators who already showed they weren’t that interested in creating something diverse.
I think it’s important to wonder why people are drawn toward media without diversity, even when they say they want diversity. It’s partly because that’s the media that’s pushed, of course, but there is diverse media to be found, and there are so many people choosing not to go looking. Why do people think this way about the diverse media that’s there?
It’s very hard to believe anyone saying they want one thing, while they show you they want something else.

hollyblack:

ivegotthekittens:

malindalo:

From today on Twitter: I often see “I wish [bestselling writer] would include POC/LGBT characters!” But There are other writers who do this. Support them.

So, you’re suggesting I read books by authors I do not like, and/or that deals with subjects I am not interested in, simply because it has a PoC/LGBT character? 

I wish certain authors would have diverse characters because these are the ones writing books I’m actually going to read. 

And I wish bestselling artists would because no matter what their next book going to be about, it would get many readers and a lot of publicity. 

Can you imagine what it would have been like for PoC and LGBT to have their group represented as one of the trio in Harry Potter? Or even just make Dumbledore openly and obviously gay? 

This is what we need. It’s not that the public isn’t aware such people exists, but they are never in the mainstream media. Correct me if I’m wrong, but seems to me this is what all those PoC justice posts are preaching. 

And best selling authors are the main streams of books, so we want them to include these characters. 

Seriously? Do you honestly believe that bestselling books are anointed and raised up by some divine hand? Like THE CLAW HAS CHOSEN? And for some reason the claw keeps choosing straight white cisgendered protagonists written by straight white cisgendered authors? REALLY?

Best selling authors don’t just HAPPEN to be in the mainstream media. Selling a lot of books MAKES someone a bestselling author and GETS mainstream media attention. But books are sold one at a time to readers who make choices about which books they want to support.

If you want more diversity, you have to buy more diversely.

And, look, I love me and I want everyone to read all my books all the time, but reading a book with a diverse cast written by JK Rowling or myself or any other white straight cisgendered writer isn’t the same as reading a book written by a person of color or a LGBTQ+ writer. It’s the difference between a secondary source and a primary source. But if you feel that FOR SOME REASON you can be absolutely sure that you’re not going to like a book you haven’t read because it isn’t already a bestseller, then I guess that’s you, but please, please, please don’t act like it’s some kind of positive political act.

And don’t you dare talk that way to Malinda.

 

I agree with everything Holly has said above and I admire that she said it without using the many expletives that came to my mind.

I see a lot of people watching shows/movies without diversity, reading books without diversity, and then asking for diversity in those books or those shows or those movies… 

You know, asking for diversity from creators who already showed they weren’t that interested in creating something diverse.

I think it’s important to wonder why people are drawn toward media without diversity, even when they say they want diversity. It’s partly because that’s the media that’s pushed, of course, but there is diverse media to be found, and there are so many people choosing not to go looking. Why do people think this way about the diverse media that’s there?

It’s very hard to believe anyone saying they want one thing, while they show you they want something else.

July 30, 2014

datvikingtho:

theyseemefangirlintheyhatin:

permets-tu:

after what feels like literally the longest week of my life working on it my marauder’s map dress for leakycon is DONE!! as a side note, i literally never want to use another fine point sharpie in my life.

THIS IS AMAZING OMG

This is beyond amazing and inspiring.

This is so so pretty, and in its beauty and the obvious hard work and dedication put into its beauty are clearly representative of Leakycon itself. Obviously I can never go, but I am SO PROUD of my beautimous friends Maureen Johnson and Robin Wasserman for running such a fantastic thing, in which everything runs smoothly and beautifully but in an individual and loving way, and I think all the authors going are amazingly fabulous (go to Malinda Lo and Alaya Dawn Johnson’s panellation! and Holly Black will teach you how to fix your book!). So: LOVELY. Everyone going to Leakycon please enjoy yourselves, get lots of books, and prepare to be dazzled by wonders.

(via bethrevis)

June 27, 2014

glamourweaver:

vriskka:

mrsolearysayswoof:

whentruthutteredlies:

inksplotched:

tinyshotaheman:

lumos5001:

shitty-post-police:

odair:

imagine a gay character who’s entire story isn’t surrounded by him being gay

image 

slow clap for JK Rowling

Imagine a gay character who is ACTUALLY SHOWN AS BEING GAY IN CANON AND POSSIBLY HAS ROMANTIC RELATIONSHIPS AND INTERESTS AND STUDF who’s whole character isn’t just about being gay

image

image

And a round of enthusiastic applause for Andrew Hussie

You’re all forgetting someone

image

I can also think of a certain local radio host…


Gee, webcomics and podcasts… almost like the only examples we can find are outside the control of major media conglomerates… what a weird coincidence!

Major media conglomerates do not appreciate or support LGBTQ characters: that is a great truth.

However Malinda Lo’s Ash and Kaisa, Rick Riordan’s Nico, Ellen Kushner’s Richard and Alec, Sarah Waters’s Maud and Susan, Scott Tracey’s Braden and Trey, Ginn Hale’s Belimai and Harper, Tamora Pierce’s Daja: there are many (though not as many as one could wish) textually gay characters who have a lot going on besides their sexuality. Most of those above even published by major media conglomerates. ;)

I see a lot of people saying ‘This thing doesn’t exist’ when what they mean is ‘this doesn’t exist in the 1% of the very most popular media I’m aware of.’ 

No offence meant to Harry Potter or anything else, but the MOST POPULAR piece of media is often not the place to find those characters—though y’know some of the above have managed to do preeeetty well—because media that upholds the white straight boy is seen as more promotable, because consumers unconsciously gravitate toward and feel more comfortable with the familiar, or just pick up what they see/hear about the most (i.e. the most promoted thing). It does often require a little extra effort (googling, ordering online) to find media that’s more diverse. But it’s worth the effort, I think.  

Or… sure, people can continue just reading Harry Potter.

June 1, 2014
Writerly Appearances, LGBTQ in YA, Celebrities And Unlucky Sheep

image

I have written you guys the longest post in all the world. But it does have bonus Who I Met in Hay on Wye!

http://sarahtales.livejournal.com/215613.html

March 23, 2014

waitingforthat3rdbook said: Do the names Hibiscus, Clytemnestra and Scylla in Sisters Before Misters represent Holly Black, Cassandra Clare and Sarah Rees Brennan? Is Marcus significant for anyone? Maureen Johnson or Malinda Lo?

Yes… although one of us did not realise we were writing a story in which the wicked witches were a little similar to us for some time, and then the other two smacked her about with throw pillows. ;)

It is true that I have been trying to get either MJ or Malinda to run away with me for some time also, but those cruel minxes keep turning me down. Oh well. Back to romance novels and the constant pursuit of evil!

March 5, 2014
I had a thought (on writing dialogue about race, etc.)

elloellenoh:

malindalo:

Sometimes I read reviews of books* in which people criticize a book for having moments that feel explainy or educational around tough topics such as race, sexuality, politics. I agree that reading dialogue about these issues can sometimes feel didactic or…

Exactly this. Thank you Malinda.

November 12, 2013
A Second Female Author Talks About Sexism and Self-Promotion

malindalo:

This one’s by me.

This one’s by Malinda, so it’s WAY AWESOMER. Trust me on this. ;)

November 12, 2013
A Female Author Talks About Sexism and Self-Promotion

sulienapgwien:

Sarah Rees Brennan on The Toast, kids.

Welp, I sure did write this, because I’m a glutton for punishment. ;)

I am only sorry I found this Charlaine Harris remark too late (warning—bad language at both links) 

http://betrayedbyabook.tumblr.com/post/52949132138/charlaine-harris-talks-about-fan-reactions-to-dead-ever

(Same goes for other gendered slurs.)

I feel very lucky the toast hosted me! And I feel EVEN MORE LUCKY Malinda Lo wrote an amazing companion essay. You’ll see, guys. You’ll see.

October 1, 2013

malindalo:

To kick off YA Pride, a month all about LGBTQ YA, you can win all of these wonderful LGBTQ YA novels. Go to malindalo.com to enter the Giant YA Pride 2013 Giveaway!

P.S. You can get an extra entry by reblogging this post; just enter the URL of your post in the Rafflecopter entry form.

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