bisexual-books
onefourkidlit:

A starred Kirkus review for OneFour Kidlit author Corinne Duyvis!
“Duyvis smoothly transitions between the two main characters’ thoughts and emotions while realistically conveying the individual alienation and terror of two very different people. Rich worldbuilding, convincing nonheteronormative relationships, balanced class issues, and nuanced, ethnically diverse characters add to the novel’s depth. The well-paced action builds toward an unexpected, thrilling conclusion that will leave readers eager for more from this promising new author. Original and compelling; a stunning debut.” (via OTHERBOUND by Corinne Duyvis | Kirkus)

I’m specially looking forward to this one.

onefourkidlit:

A starred Kirkus review for OneFour Kidlit author Corinne Duyvis!

“Duyvis smoothly transitions between the two main characters’ thoughts and emotions while realistically conveying the individual alienation and terror of two very different people. Rich worldbuilding, convincing nonheteronormative relationships, balanced class issues, and nuanced, ethnically diverse characters add to the novel’s depth. The well-paced action builds toward an unexpected, thrilling conclusion that will leave readers eager for more from this promising new author. Original and compelling; a stunning debut.”

(via OTHERBOUND by Corinne Duyvis | Kirkus)

I’m specially looking forward to this one.

elloellenoh

elloellenoh:

Prophecy is a Kindle $1.99 deal today! Have no idea how long it is for but please help me spread the word!! Thanks!

hollyblack

UK TOUR SCHEDULE

hollyblack:

At long last, I bring you the Sarah Rees Brennan and Holly Black UK Tour:

Thursday 31st October - Sunday 3rd November


Monday 4th November
Dark Mirrors: Gothic Fiction with Holly Black and Sarah Rees Brennan
Where: Foyles, Charing Cross Road, London WC2H 0EB
When: 6.30pm-7.30pm
Tickets: Free, but booking is essential. To book tickets, email events@foyles.co.uk or call 020 7437 5660
Tonight we journey to dark places with two of the biggest names in teen fantasy. The walled cities known as Coldtowns are the hellish creation of Holly Black, author of The Spiderwick Chronicles and now The Coldest Girl in Coldtown. Within them, quarantined monsters mingle with humans in a neverending, decadently bloody party, which, in an all-too-recognisable twist, is shown on TV 24 hours a day.

Kami Glass’s hometown of Sorry-in-the-Vale, the setting for the new novel by Sarah Rees Brennan, Untold, plays host to an uneasy blend of natural and supernatural. Conflict threatens to bubble over at every turn between the non-magical townspeople and the sorcerers who yearn to rule over them - and seventeen-year-old Kami faces her own internal conflict, as the sorcerer she’s been bound to for her entire life is torn from her.
Join us to find out for yourself how these two inspirational authors create their magical worlds, unforgettable characters and breathtaking stories, and hear their tips for creating a gothic novel of your own.
Tuesday 5th November
An evening with Queens of Gothic fiction, Holly Black and Sarah Rees Brennan
Where: Waterstones 93-97 Albion Street, Leeds LS1 5AP
When: 6.30pm-7.30pm
Tickets: £4 / £3 for Waterstones Cardholders, available in-store or by calling 0113 2444 588
Join us at this Bonfire Night special with bestselling YA authors Sarah Rees Brennan & Holly Black, who will be discussing their new books, work, inspirations and top tips on becoming a writer! Sarah’s new novel Untold and Holly’s new novel The Coldest Girl in Coldtown will also be available on the night. The evening will include a talk, Q&A and signing session.
 
Wednesday 6th November
Gothic Fiction with Holly Black and Sarah Rees Brennan
Where: Seven Stories Children’s Book Centre, Ouseburn Valley, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 2PQ
When: 6pm-7pm
Tickets: £3 per person (including admission to the centre). Call 0845 271 0777 ext 715 to book.
Join teen authors Holly Black and Sarah Rees-Brennan for a fun event talking about all things gothic fiction. Holly Black is the US author of bestselling contemporary fantasy books, including The Spiderwick Chronicles and her new book The Coldest Girl in Coldtown. Sarah Rees Brennan is the Irish author of Unspoken, Untold, and her bestselling Demon’s Lexicon trilogy. Come along to hear all about their books, writing and inspirations – and find out their top tips on how to write a book of your own.
 
Thursday 7th November
Meet Teen Authors Holly Black and Sarah Rees Brennan
Where: Waterstone’s Liverpool One, 12 College Lane, Liverpool L1 3DL
When: 6pm-7pm
Tickets: Tickets are free, but booking is essential. Please call 0151 709 9820.
Join teen authors Holly Black (US author of The Coldest Girl in Coldtown and the bestselling Spiderwick Chronicles series) and Sarah Rees-Brennan (Unspoken, Untold, The Demon’s Lexicon) as they talk about their books, their inspirations and their writing – and discover their top tips for writing stories of your own. Tickets are free but spaces are limited – get yours soon.

I am super excited to be going on a UK tour (Liverpool! My mum’s from Liverpool so I specially want to EVENT there) and super excited to be with Holly Black, who as all know is a lady of Gothic splendour and a wicked delight forever. I promise shocking tales. Spoilers. Spoilers for everything! Prizes. Skits. Anything you wish. Come see us, and kidnap me and take me to a bonfire if you like!

No, nobody’s saying anyone should stop reading.
There are many ways to get free books.
http://www.gutenberg.org/
Thousands of books that are out of copyright, their authors dead and unable to be hurt. Jane Austen, William Thackeray, Anthony Trollope, to name three I love. If you like horror, there’s Dracula and Carmilla.
If you like fantasy, I really recommend George MacDonald Fraser’s ‘The Princess and the Goblin.’ http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/34339
There’s fanfiction. Tons of great fanfiction out there for free.
There are discounted ebooks, and sometimes ebooks given away for free, for certain periods of time, to look out for.
Used books are much cheaper than new—and used books are different from piracy, as it’s a copy that was bought by someone, who then could do whatever they will with that one copy. I am not sure of your situation, but in some places books are set out on stoops to be taken away, books available on lending systems in bars and coffee shops, books available outside used bookshops with tip jars. Many authors and book blogs offer free copies, and you can enter as many of those draws as you want.
There are online book borrowing chains, like http://bookmooch.com/ - if people can afford postage, that’s a great way to get books.
There are many, many authors who write free things you can read legally. They write things for free, hoping that readers might want to buy some of their stuff that’s for sale—but also just wanting to share their writing, and hoping people enjoy.
Seanan McGuire’s shorts, many of which are free:
http://seananmcguire.com/icshorts.php
http://seananmcguire.com/velhome.php
http://seananmcguire.com/tobyshorts.php
Also short stories on her livejournal: http://seanan-mcguire.livejournal.com/351126.html
Short stories by Kelley Armstrong, who has also written a lot:
http://www.darkestpowers.com/category/short-stories/
http://www.kelleyarmstrong.com/free-online-fiction/
Ilona Andrews, whose books I love:
http://www.ilona-andrews.com/books/ebooks/curran-volume-1
http://www.ilona-andrews.com/books/ebooks/curran-vol-ii-fathers-and-sons
I myself have written huge amounts of free stuff online myself. Feel free to read it! Please make yourself free of it and enjoy.
http://sarahreesbrennan.com/extras/
The Turn of the Story: http://sarahtales.livejournal.com/209287.html
For those who say they want to try before they buy—there are lots of ways to try out a writer without piracy.
And there are authors who are going to say: yes, okay to piracy. Neil Gaiman apparently is one. Cory Doctorow is another famous example, and provides free copies of his own work. (Men’s work is always valued more than women’s work, and I would be surprised if more people didn’t come back and buy a guy’s book after they got it for free, because the guy ‘deserved’ it—so I am not surprised by seeing more guy authors having a more relaxed attitude. Similarly, I doubt all that many guys have been scolded and told they should feel lucky that anyone’s paying attention to them if they are against book piracy.)
It sucks not being able to have the specific book you want, of course. Yesterday I was having a tantrum on twitter because I want Courtney Milan’s The Heiress Effect, and my ereader store (Sony) doesn’t have it yet. I want it! But I can’t have it. Same thing happened with A Kiss For Midwinter—eventually it came in, and I bought it. I want it, and I want it now—and I can’t have it now. That sucks. But I don’t intend to punish Courtney Milan for that. I will wait, and buy it when I can.
It sucks to be in a country where you can’t buy books. I wish there was a system in place to make regional ebooks a thing of the past—I hope it’s something that will happen in the future.
It sucks to not have enough money to buy a book. (Though there are different versions of ‘I can’t afford.’ I admit, it stings and is horrible to be told ‘I couldn’t afford your book’ by someone who means ‘I wished to spend the money on something else instead, like this fancy belt, and have BOTH things, and I didn’t care about the effect it had on anyone but me.’ It’s quite different to ‘It’s the choice between your book and dinner’—of course dinner should win.)
I don’t like piracy, but I understand there are reasons to pirate—but I also think that it should be borne in mind that piracy can hurt authors, and that authors are people. It can hurt libraries, which hurts people who are very badly off. It can hurt bookshops, which hurts people’s chances of discovering new books to love, or a love for books at all. It can hurt readers, if a favourite author’s books aren’t published anymore and they never get to read new books from them.
I think that it’s good to remind people of that, so they can consider if they do really need to pirate books.
And if they feel that they truly don’t have another way to get the books and the books would be a huge comfort to them, I think it’s good to know that piracy hurts authors so later, if people are in a different position, they can remember to buy the books. (Worth noting: remember that authors who don’t sell are often let go by their old publishers and have to (if they’re lucky), find new ones, so buy the newer books by the new publishers if you can.)
Remember, too, that piracy affects libraries, and libraries are vitally important to people who cannot afford luxury items like computers and ereaders—who are in a worse position than most.
http://seanan-mcguire.livejournal.com/390067.html
I know that I am lucky: lucky to have the job I have, for however long it lasts, and lucky in that while I been in the position where I skipped a meal in order to buy a book, I am no longer in that position, and have never been in a position where I would have had to skip several meals: where I was facing real privation.
I know this stuff is complicated.
http://terribleminds.com/ramble/2013/02/05/25-thoughts-on-book-piracy/
And I know it sucks. But I think there should be awareness that authors are people, and people who are harmed, and dropped by their publishers, and also emotionally upset, by this stuff.
Quoting Seanan McGuire again (sorry Seanan! It’s been a Seanan-With-Seanan-On-Top Day!) 
‘It is absolutely complicated… That’s also why it was “please don’t pirate,” not “if you pirate you are scum and I hate you and you can never never never be a true fan, ever.”

Part of the problem for me, as a creator, is that the more we-as-people become distanced from the work—the more the work is viewed as this amorphous “thing” that just sprung into being without human intervention, but which pays THE MAN in royalties when you buy it—the easier it is to not stop and think “okay, did I love this enough to pay for it? Did I love this enough to pay for something else by the same person?” And that’s part of why we keep talking about it. We need to remain part of the conversation, with our mortgages and our hungry cats, or we’re in even more trouble than we already are.’

No, nobody’s saying anyone should stop reading.

There are many ways to get free books.

http://www.gutenberg.org/

Thousands of books that are out of copyright, their authors dead and unable to be hurt. Jane Austen, William Thackeray, Anthony Trollope, to name three I love. If you like horror, there’s Dracula and Carmilla.

If you like fantasy, I really recommend George MacDonald Fraser’s ‘The Princess and the Goblin.’ http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/34339

There’s fanfiction. Tons of great fanfiction out there for free.

There are discounted ebooks, and sometimes ebooks given away for free, for certain periods of time, to look out for.

Used books are much cheaper than new—and used books are different from piracy, as it’s a copy that was bought by someone, who then could do whatever they will with that one copy. I am not sure of your situation, but in some places books are set out on stoops to be taken away, books available on lending systems in bars and coffee shops, books available outside used bookshops with tip jars. Many authors and book blogs offer free copies, and you can enter as many of those draws as you want.

There are online book borrowing chains, like http://bookmooch.com/ - if people can afford postage, that’s a great way to get books.

There are many, many authors who write free things you can read legally. They write things for free, hoping that readers might want to buy some of their stuff that’s for sale—but also just wanting to share their writing, and hoping people enjoy.

Seanan McGuire’s shorts, many of which are free:

http://seananmcguire.com/icshorts.php

http://seananmcguire.com/velhome.php

http://seananmcguire.com/tobyshorts.php

Also short stories on her livejournal: http://seanan-mcguire.livejournal.com/351126.html

Short stories by Kelley Armstrong, who has also written a lot:

http://www.darkestpowers.com/category/short-stories/

http://www.kelleyarmstrong.com/free-online-fiction/

Ilona Andrews, whose books I love:

http://www.ilona-andrews.com/books/ebooks/curran-volume-1

http://www.ilona-andrews.com/books/ebooks/curran-vol-ii-fathers-and-sons

I myself have written huge amounts of free stuff online myself. Feel free to read it! Please make yourself free of it and enjoy.

http://sarahreesbrennan.com/extras/

The Turn of the Story: http://sarahtales.livejournal.com/209287.html

For those who say they want to try before they buy—there are lots of ways to try out a writer without piracy.

And there are authors who are going to say: yes, okay to piracy. Neil Gaiman apparently is one. Cory Doctorow is another famous example, and provides free copies of his own work. (Men’s work is always valued more than women’s work, and I would be surprised if more people didn’t come back and buy a guy’s book after they got it for free, because the guy ‘deserved’ it—so I am not surprised by seeing more guy authors having a more relaxed attitude. Similarly, I doubt all that many guys have been scolded and told they should feel lucky that anyone’s paying attention to them if they are against book piracy.)

It sucks not being able to have the specific book you want, of course. Yesterday I was having a tantrum on twitter because I want Courtney Milan’s The Heiress Effect, and my ereader store (Sony) doesn’t have it yet. I want it! But I can’t have it. Same thing happened with A Kiss For Midwinter—eventually it came in, and I bought it. I want it, and I want it now—and I can’t have it now. That sucks. But I don’t intend to punish Courtney Milan for that. I will wait, and buy it when I can.

It sucks to be in a country where you can’t buy books. I wish there was a system in place to make regional ebooks a thing of the past—I hope it’s something that will happen in the future.

It sucks to not have enough money to buy a book. (Though there are different versions of ‘I can’t afford.’ I admit, it stings and is horrible to be told ‘I couldn’t afford your book’ by someone who means ‘I wished to spend the money on something else instead, like this fancy belt, and have BOTH things, and I didn’t care about the effect it had on anyone but me.’ It’s quite different to ‘It’s the choice between your book and dinner’—of course dinner should win.)

I don’t like piracy, but I understand there are reasons to pirate—but I also think that it should be borne in mind that piracy can hurt authors, and that authors are people. It can hurt libraries, which hurts people who are very badly off. It can hurt bookshops, which hurts people’s chances of discovering new books to love, or a love for books at all. It can hurt readers, if a favourite author’s books aren’t published anymore and they never get to read new books from them.

I think that it’s good to remind people of that, so they can consider if they do really need to pirate books.

And if they feel that they truly don’t have another way to get the books and the books would be a huge comfort to them, I think it’s good to know that piracy hurts authors so later, if people are in a different position, they can remember to buy the books. (Worth noting: remember that authors who don’t sell are often let go by their old publishers and have to (if they’re lucky), find new ones, so buy the newer books by the new publishers if you can.)

Remember, too, that piracy affects libraries, and libraries are vitally important to people who cannot afford luxury items like computers and ereaders—who are in a worse position than most.

http://seanan-mcguire.livejournal.com/390067.html

I know that I am lucky: lucky to have the job I have, for however long it lasts, and lucky in that while I been in the position where I skipped a meal in order to buy a book, I am no longer in that position, and have never been in a position where I would have had to skip several meals: where I was facing real privation.

I know this stuff is complicated.

http://terribleminds.com/ramble/2013/02/05/25-thoughts-on-book-piracy/

And I know it sucks. But I think there should be awareness that authors are people, and people who are harmed, and dropped by their publishers, and also emotionally upset, by this stuff.

Quoting Seanan McGuire again (sorry Seanan! It’s been a Seanan-With-Seanan-On-Top Day!) 

It is absolutely complicated… That’s also why it was “please don’t pirate,” not “if you pirate you are scum and I hate you and you can never never never be a true fan, ever.”

Part of the problem for me, as a creator, is that the more we-as-people become distanced from the work—the more the work is viewed as this amorphous “thing” that just sprung into being without human intervention, but which pays THE MAN in royalties when you buy it—the easier it is to not stop and think “okay, did I love this enough to pay for it? Did I love this enough to pay for something else by the same person?” And that’s part of why we keep talking about it. We need to remain part of the conversation, with our mortgages and our hungry cats, or we’re in even more trouble than we already are.

I favour both at different times. The ereader is better for travelling, because I read twenty Gothic novels while wandering around Egypt, and I did not want to carry twenty Gothic novels with me in my purse. The physical book is a much less risky proposition for reading in the bath.
I love travelling and I love taking baths. I HAVE NEEDS, GUYS.
Actually, the ereader I’ve got is a Sony ereader. Are kindles/nooks the cool ones to have?
This is just like me. I am never cool. I also have issues with technology.
My BFF and I were driving through Slovenia in her convertible (MY BFF’S VERY FANCY!) and she gave me her mini-iPod and I became so distressed and confused as I tried to manipulate it that I…
… I don’t think I dropped it per se.
… I just think the mini-iPod took its own life by leaping from a moving vehicle, due to my inexpert mauling.
I have a Walkman. I took it out at dinner, I remember, and the friend I was dining with was like ‘… what’s that artefact? Seems ancient and mysterious. Does it require sacrifices?’ (Then I beat her.)
What I’m trying to tell you is that I’m deeply uncool, and I like both paper books and ereader books. BOOKS.

I favour both at different times. The ereader is better for travelling, because I read twenty Gothic novels while wandering around Egypt, and I did not want to carry twenty Gothic novels with me in my purse. The physical book is a much less risky proposition for reading in the bath.

I love travelling and I love taking baths. I HAVE NEEDS, GUYS.

Actually, the ereader I’ve got is a Sony ereader. Are kindles/nooks the cool ones to have?

This is just like me. I am never cool. I also have issues with technology.

My BFF and I were driving through Slovenia in her convertible (MY BFF’S VERY FANCY!) and she gave me her mini-iPod and I became so distressed and confused as I tried to manipulate it that I…

… I don’t think I dropped it per se.

… I just think the mini-iPod took its own life by leaping from a moving vehicle, due to my inexpert mauling.

I have a Walkman. I took it out at dinner, I remember, and the friend I was dining with was like ‘… what’s that artefact? Seems ancient and mysterious. Does it require sacrifices?’ (Then I beat her.)

What I’m trying to tell you is that I’m deeply uncool, and I like both paper books and ereader books. BOOKS.

ON INTERNET INVISIBILITY

I feel the White Queen, a TV series about the War of the Roses, needs more Richard. But Aneurin Barnard is rocking it so far. I think he’s just fantastic.

But this reminds me of watching the White Queen on Sunday night, and tweeting that I was yelling for Richard, just a sprinkle more Richard, RICHARD!

I was about to launch into a series of tweets about the White Queen, including my eagle-eyed search for the zippers in the costumes, when the writer of the TV series tweeted at me that there would definitely be more Richard soon!

… ‘DEAR SWEET GOD,’ I thought to myself. ‘SHE CAN SEE ME! ABORT! ABORT! THIS PARACHUTE IS A KNAPSACK!’

Now, I’ve got nothing against the screenwriter seeing me, or talking to me. It’s all fine. I’d just forgotten that she could, and remembering gave me a shock.

You get into the habit of thinking that the internet is your living room, and then you think to yourself: 

Wait. This room is made of glass, and being broadcast to a billion channels.

AND I’M NAKED.

Internet invisibility is something we all believe in, and it’s something that’s never true.

Which brings me to—being on the internet, and seeing stuff, not about your writing, but about yourself.

Of course, it’s tricky to disentangle the two: sometimes people will say ‘SRB’s not funny’ and they will mean ‘SRB’s books do not tickle my particular funny bone.’ I remember one writer getting sent a link that said ‘SCREW YOU AUTHOR NAME’ and they were like ‘WHAT OH MY GOD’ and they were told it wasn’t personal (and indeed, the link had specific book critique in it and not specific-hatred-of-how-the-author-smelled) but said writer, of course, found it very hard not to take ‘SCREW YOU, MY NAME’ personally. It was their personal name. This stuff is TANGLED UP.

But if we try to separate out the writing stuff from the personal stuff, though that is difficult… I’ve seen a lot of crappy stuff about myself on the internet. I saw it—because it was on the internet, and so was I. Sometimes I found it, often it was sent to me. There is a LOT OF IT.

I’m not thin, I dress so badly, I behaved very rudely that one time, that joke was so inappropriate, I’m not a lady, I should think of the children more, I’m often wrong about stuff, I shouldn’t be talking because I’m an author, as an author it is my absolute responsibility to be talking but I should be saying different stuff, please engage and learn, DO NOT ENGAGE, I’m a bitch because of a conversation that happened, I’m a bitch because of a conversation someone made up in their head because they don’t like me, I think a lot of myself don’t I, I’m not as smart as I think I am, I’m not as pretty as I think I am, I’m not as awesome as I think I am, I have the wrong friends, I chose to write on the wrong topic, I’m wearing the wrong bra. (No, really, the bra came up.)

And of course, boy, it’d be nice if I was wrong a lot less often, I appreciate being corrected so as to be less wrong in the future. And quite often an author shouldn’t be talking—an author weighing in about their own book (‘That’s not what that meant!’ ‘My work is a timeless masterpiece!’ ‘You misinterpreted me!) is often a conversation-killer. Also, a writer could potentially get their readers to go after someone, and that is deeply uncool. It’s not always appropriate for a writer to talk, and sometimes I’ve misjudged that badly. Some of the crappy stuff about me on the internet is quite true! But all of the crappy stuff builds into a strange twisted picture of a monster.

I’ve seen a lot of really nice stuff about myself on the internet, too, and that’s awesome, but it isn’t any more me than the awful-bad-wrong-nightmare-monster of me.

Sometimes I wonder why I keep looking at stuff on the internet, and I wonder why in God’s name I keep talking about stuff on the internet.

I mean, I have looked sorrowfully about myself, and thought, there are mega-popular authors who have done things I think of as utterly awful who are not getting flak in the same way as I am. And there are ways to avoid being criticised a lot: don’t talk about important stuff, be very apologetic, shut up, don’t talk to anyone who might cause a problem in future, don’t talk to anyone who has a problem with you, back off, shut up.

But trying to make yourself invisible doesn’t work. You can make yourself smaller, but while you may be less noticeable, you’re also… well, smaller, trying less, avoiding more, doing less.

Internet invisibility isn’t true, and that goes for me and for you. But there are benefits to the great glass internet elevator. I have read Diana Wynne Jones’s essays, and thought ‘I wish I’d known she thought like that, I wish I’d had a chance to talk with her’ and the internet gives more of us a chance to communicate more. I think that’s great. I know I’ve learned a lot from the internet: I’ve had some people tell me that they’ve learned something from me, and that’s awesome and humbling.

I think it’s important to keep talking and to keep listening.

I remember seeing once ‘I wish Sarah Rees Brennan would act more like (Author Name Redacted).’

I remember it especially because Author Name Redacted had actually written to me saying she wished she could speak out (about feminism: that was the subject under discussion) but she was terrified of the reaction if she got it wrong. And I was like, well, yeah, I hear you, getting it wrong feels awful!

But then I saw that, and I thought to myself: well, that’s someone saying, boy do I like it when a woman is silenced because she’s afraid. She’s much better than when she’s talking. If only we could do that to more women, specifically THAT ONE, GET HER.

And oh my friends and oh my foes, I’m not here for that.

Being a person on the internet is complicated: if people have any idea who you are, they probably have a very weird idea of you.

Internet villains and internet heroes are pretty easy to create. If someone’s decided to think negatively of someone, everything feeds into that. If someone’s decided to think positively of someone, they’ll often think much too positively of them.

Of course, positivity can turn into negativity, especially for ladies, because ladies are held to very strict standards and you know, once they’ve made a mistake, they are worthless wenches indeed. 

Plus, the longer a lady’s around, the older (horror) and more outspoken (DOUBLE HORROR) she’ll get and the more time she’ll have to make mistakes, as flawed people will.

I have a good friend who says that women have a ‘three-year rule’… that’s the longest a lady can be in the public eye before people start to hate her.

Of course, that’s famous people. I am not talking about famous people. Famous people often just cannot be on the internet. Angelina Jolie and Beyonce are not on it for obvious reasons: they would go completely doolally if they saw all that stuff on the internet. Same goes for J.K. Rowling or Suzanne Collins, who you really don’t see a lot of on the interwebs either. There’s too much nastiness and too much worship to cope with.

I am distinctly not-famous, so I can’t even imagine what that would be like. I’m not saying everyone should be on the internet, or that people shouldn’t take breaks. Everyone has to decide what they can cope with.

But for those of us on the internet, who have a little bit of that stuff to cope with, and who are thinking about how to cope with it…

I remember going on a website, and seeing someone say ‘sarah was a flawless princess, as she always is’—and that was pretty awesome to see! But a year later on the same website, I saw ‘SRB, that dumb bitch, so tired of her.’ Which was not awesome. But neither of them were true. Neither of them were about me, not really.

I’m not a flawless princess. I’m not a dumb bitch, either. (Sometimes I’m a smart bitch. Sometimes I’m kind of dumb but likable. Sometimes I’m a princess, largely of imaginary lands.)

Being a person on the internet is complicated, but that’s because being a person is complicated, and in the new internet-tastic age there are new ways to be a person and interact with people.

We are not, ever, invisible or unheard. And that’s terrifying, but it’s beautiful too.

Indeed. ;)
GENTS: write a thing.
WORLD: What he’s saying is interesting, yet problematic, these themes are universal themes, how does this fit in in the wider body of LITERACHUR, the seven basic plots, stranger comes to town or person goes on a journey, in the style of InsertOtherDudeHere but with a fascinating variation, there should be an article about this, there should be an article about this in the NEW YORK TIMES.
LADIES: write a thing.
WORLD: Bitches, am I right?

Indeed. ;)

GENTS: write a thing.

WORLD: What he’s saying is interesting, yet problematic, these themes are universal themes, how does this fit in in the wider body of LITERACHUR, the seven basic plots, stranger comes to town or person goes on a journey, in the style of InsertOtherDudeHere but with a fascinating variation, there should be an article about this, there should be an article about this in the NEW YORK TIMES.

LADIES: write a thing.

WORLD: Bitches, am I right?

lbardugo

lbardugo:

BASICALLY i’m really angry because it seems that nowadays a lot more young adult books are geared toward girls rather than guys which is fine but i’m a guy and while guys *can* read about girls falling in love with the perfect guy while trying to save the world… it’s not really that relatable. ok also sorry if i sound sexist. anyway do you have any book recommendations more geared toward guys?


This was not addressed to me, but it came up in the Shadow and Bone tag so I’m going to respond to it briefly.

1. Would you have skipped reading Harry Potter if it had been told from Hermione’s POV (or assigned POV)? Would you have skipped reading Percy Jackson if it had been more explicitly Annabeth’s journey? Then you would have missed out on two incredible, game-changing series.

2. There is no shortage of fiction (literary, genre, children’s) that focuses on male protagonists. I think it’s possible that the popularity of YA speaks to the hunger for more female protagonists. I don’t see why that should incite anger.

3. Also, what YA are you reading? Sure, there are stories that follow the formula you describe, but it’s also pretty reductive. I think if you do a little looking, you’ll find a category brimming with fantastic stories, new worlds, action, and adventure. Yes, there’s often a romantic element, but most of the YA I see coming out now doesn’t focus on that as the ultimate goal of the story. It’s more about the hero or heroine’s journey and there isn’t always a happily ever after in the offing.

Also, I’d point out that there are frequently romantic elements in stories that focus on male characters or multiple POV and this is true across all genres. Tom Clancy, George R.R. Martin, James Patterson, John Grisham, Stephen King—the heavy hitters don’t shy away from romantic entanglements. Maybe we cut them more slack because they’re presented through the male lens?

If you’re looking for male protags in YA, literally the first that come to mind are Finnikin of the Rock and its sequel Froi of the Exiles by Melina Marchetta (high fantasy), The Marbury Lens by Andrew Smith (horror/fantasy), Taken by Erin Bowman (dystopian), and Looking for Alaska by John Green (contemporary). I don’t know if these are “geared toward guys.” They all have different focuses for their narratives and different levels of romance. In the end, I think it depends on the guy.


Finally, regarding sexism: Saying that you don’t like romance in your stories is different than saying that you can’t relate to female characters. I’m not sure which is true for you because they kind of got conflated in one statement “finding the perfect guy and saving the world.” If you didn’t like Bella’s story because it focuses largely on her relationship with Edward and that’s not your thing, I get it. But if you can’t relate to Buffy or Katniss or Jane Eyre or Jo March—any girl with a job to do who might fall in love or lust or whatever along the way—that makes me kind of sad.

There’s room for all kind of heroes and heroines and some of our greatest stories happen to be love stories too. Love, friendship, sexual attraction— all essential parts of life. It’s only when girls or women become the audience that we start to turn our noses up at something that we all care about.

Leigh Bardugo, what a lady.

Sadly, there are a lot of people who would have skipped Harry Potter if Hermione was the protagonist. There are amazing books out there which are not becoming cultural phenomena because of sexism. The books which got there despite it are to be much applauded—and get a lot more sneering than Harry Potter and Percy.

This reminds me of the post that was going around about YA (FOR KIDS?! ABOUT GirLS? TEENagE GIrls?!)… that was reblogged by feminist blogs, that made me see absolute red.

http://sarahreesbrennan.tumblr.com/post/42605232852/the-ya-section-of-any-given-bookstore-normal-girl

A girl saving the world shouldn’t be sneered at. A girl having a romance shouldn’t be sneered at, either.

And of course, as Leigh points out, MOST BOOKS HAVE ROMANCE IN THEM. Where are the people moaning ‘Oh come on Stephen King, less love, more beetles that cause the apocalypse!’

Whereas a lady writer can write SUE STABBATIA VS THE BEETLES OF THE APOCALYPSE.

PUBLISHERS: Time for a pink cover.

READERS: Ah, another silly girl book about love.

AUTHOR: Yeah, the love of a woman for a machete…

There is a study showing that in a classroom full of girls and guys, if the girls are talking the same amount as the guys, it’s perceived as the girls taking over the discussion. 

Men tend to talk more than women.

And yet there’s a myth that women are way, way more talky. Because women are meant to be *silent*, so people don’t like it—people criticise it and sneer at it—when women talk.

How much worse, if women are being the stars and saving the world? The fact they’re doing it at all in some books is seen as them doing it WAY TOO MUCH, the women are dominating the conversation! Will nobody think of the poor guys?

Feeling hard done by in this circumstance is natural, because we’re raised in a messed up world. But readers, writers, people of the world, think about if you really want to say that girls can’t save the world, can’t be the heroes, or that love is stupid.

Think of what people are losing up there in that giant No Girls Welcome clubhouse.

Don’t be angry that women are not silent.