Sarah Rees Brennan

Aug 20

lynburning:

Indigo is featuring Unspoken in their epic series table!

That’s just MY BOOK with a millionty amazing authors! 
(Look I stole—accidentally—ten Terry Pratchett books from my school library. It was an accident!)
(You’ve seen my Outlander and Game of Thrones livetweets. And if you haven’t… probably good. You may still have some respect for me. ;))
Also, I recognise that Kelley Armstrong book just from the little top bit.
Basically I love you Indigo and I love you Canada and thank you for taking the photo lynburning: I am only delighted.

lynburning:

Indigo is featuring Unspoken in their epic series table!

That’s just MY BOOK with a millionty amazing authors! 

(Look I stole—accidentally—ten Terry Pratchett books from my school library. It was an accident!)

(You’ve seen my Outlander and Game of Thrones livetweets. And if you haven’t… probably good. You may still have some respect for me. ;))

Also, I recognise that Kelley Armstrong book just from the little top bit.

Basically I love you Indigo and I love you Canada and thank you for taking the photo lynburning: I am only delighted.

Aug 19

naturallysteph:

"Love Can Be Simple" — This essay by Nina LaCour had me in tears. It’s about love and religion and writing and being an LGBT teenager and everything.
Her latest novel, Everything Leads to You, is my favorite love story of the year. Have you read it yet?

naturallysteph:

"Love Can Be Simple" — This essay by Nina LaCour had me in tears. It’s about love and religion and writing and being an LGBT teenager and everything.

Her latest novel, Everything Leads to You, is my favorite love story of the year. Have you read it yet?

[video]

Aug 18

[video]

Aug 14

teacupdream:

image

With a Little Help From My (Loser) Friends, a fanmix for Sarah Rees Brennan’s The Turn of the Story.

once was love | ingrid michaelson | eight easy steps | alanis morisette | out of my league | stephen speaks | nice people | ida maria | king & lionheart | of monsters and men | please don’t leave me | p!nk | strong anything | katrina elam | uncharted | sara bareilles | good day | jewel | going through the motions | aimee mann | alien | britney spears | with a little help from my friends | kick axe covers the beatles

LISTEN HERE )

Read More

This is SO COOL I almost can’t take it. I’m so happy the songs are about all three of the main characters and that there are interconnected songs about the developing relationships and the personalities of each one. So thoughtful and so flatterin’ to me to see such thought put in. Plus, I love so many of these artists and also I love the awesome album cover. Loser friends, tee hee.

Definitely going to listen to some of these while writing now…

emayaosi said: It's really disappointing to see you co-sign that Holly Black post as if the majority of YA authors don't write about very whitewashed worlds where queer/trans/poc people may as well not exist. Telling people to change that reality with their purchasing power is a tad hypocritical when you all write a certain way because you know that's what sells. I'd be more sympathetic to your point if you weren't directly contributing to the problem.

maureenjohnsonbooks:

The point of Holly’s post is that buying works by PoC/LGBTQ/trans writers will literally change the landscape of what’s out there and what’s a bestseller and what’s mainstream. I do sign on to that.

As for the need for more diversity in all books being written, yes to that too. Though, I wish you wouldn’t say I am doing something because “you know that’s what sells.” People think writers do EVERYTHING because “that’s what sells.” People are always reading our minds/explaining our motives—people from every standpoint. Most book banners use the “you do this because this is what sells” in order to denigrate work. My goal for myself is to try harder and do better and make good stories.

But the point remains that diverse writers of diverse books are out there, and by buying their books, the playing field changes. It sounds like maybe you aren’t aware of all these writers. That’s a problem. But it’s something that so many good people are working on now, to bring these writers up to the front of the store/the reading list.

I don’t think it’s wrong to say that diverse authors are writing diverse books: writing the best diverse books, and they should be supported.

Absolutely at the same time other authors should be writing diverse fiction too. There is no excuse not to do so and I didn’t see anyone making an excuse for why they did not. All the authors I saw talking about this do write diverse fiction. I’m not saying that they do it perfectly—everyone should always be working on doing it better—but they do it.

I’d be wary of condemning people for doing ‘what sells’ as well. Yes, people want to make money at their job. Yes, books need to be bought to succeed. The books need to be bought to change the game: the books need to be bought to get other books published. Writers writing diverse fiction is crucial but readers supporting that fiction, which already exists, is even more crucial to move forward and get more. I saw a wonderful reblog of my earlier post in which the poster said that people need to admit the things we gravitate toward, the things we choose to buy/support, do not exist in a vacuum: popular work does not get popular all on its own or at random. We need to think about what books get bought and what authors get supported.

The system is already privileging white straight writers. Readers who want diverse fiction shouldn’t privilege them, too.

Aug 13

LONCON SCHEDULE

sarahreesbrennan:

As I pack for Texas and RWA, I remember I have not yet shared the deets for my next convention, Loncon, here in London! (So little travel, huzzah!)

And girl, look at these panels.

Fresh Beasts

Thursday 15:00 - 16:30

YA writes seem particuarly keen on supernatural monsters. Have we mined out the traditional ones — the Vampires, demons and zombies? What fresh angles would breathe new afterlife into them? Or do we need a whole slew of fresh beasts to keep the reader’s interest?

Ellen Datlow, Tom Pollock, Sarah Rees Brennan, V. E. Schwab, Oisin McGann 

The Exceptional Girl Warrior

Friday 10:00 - 11:00

Some female warriors represent the norm in their fantasy or science fictional societies and are expected to train and fight alongside their men. Others are “exceptions”, who need to battle the prejudice of their colleagues just as much as their enemies. Panelists will discuss female fighters of every kind, taking examples both from real life and fiction. What are the strengths and weaknesses of the characters under discussion? How has representation of female warriors changed over time? How does the author’s treatment of these characters vary by genre if at all?

Elisabeth Waters (M), John Dodd, Kate Elliott, Sarah Maas, Sarah Rees Brennan

Teen Romance

Friday 15:00 - 16:30

Romance is in the air! Authors discuss the trend of weaving romantic entanglements into young adult literature. From true love to pining for that special someone, authors tackle the thorny subject of love, sex, and the supernatural—not to mention the fateful first kiss. What is it about a supernatural love interest that leaves mere mortals a distant second? Is there a discernible difference in how teen romance is handled between SF/F and its peer genres? And how far is too far when writing teen romance?

Mary Anne Mohanraj (M), Amie Kaufman , Mary Turzillo, Sarah Rees Brennan, Darlene Marshall

These Are Not the Elves You’re Looking For

Sunday 18:00 - 19:00

To what extent do modern fantasy novels play on readers’ familiarity - and fatigue - with genre tropes and conventions? For example, Andrzej Sapkowski, Justina Robson and Raymond E Feist have all created worlds in which the traditional Tolkienian model of benevolent, wiser-than-thou elves is challenged in various ways. Is deconstruction a new trend, or has genre fantasy been doing it for decades? How do recent debates about the cultural specificity of the English-language fantastic, and the lack of relevance of this aesthetic for audiences outside North America and the UK, affect our views of these issues?

Kate Heartfield (M), Ana Grilo, Stanislaw Krawczyk, Sarah Rees Brennan, Patrick Rothfuss

How fancy am I, fancying with these fancy people? I am VERY much looking forward to Lonconing it up!

Loncon is tomorrow! *checks time* Loncon is today, I am a vile truant and should be in bed as we speak!

I have an additional THING here: A SIGNING. Now basically if you find me I will sign a thing for you. Love signing stuff. Other people’s cheques obviously. Also books. Sometimes books I’ve written. All for it. If you see me bouncing about the con and wish for me to sign… a name, mine or anyone else’s… a book, or a face or a baby elephant… I’ll do that.

But for those who wish to be sure to catch me and have a chat…

So, my signing is on Sunday the 17th August at noon. (Such fancy signing people! Mike Carey. ROBIN HOBB. M’friend Seanan McGuire.) FANCIES.

Quick addition to the panels also: Leigh Bardugo will be on the Exceptional Girl Warrior panel. She’s an exceptionally smart lady and an exceptionally hot blonde so I welcome her…

[video]

hollyblack:

ivegotthekittens:

malindalo:

From today on Twitter: I often see “I wish [bestselling writer] would include POC/LGBT characters!” But There are other writers who do this. Support them.

So, you’re suggesting I read books by authors I do not like, and/or that deals with subjects I am not interested in, simply because it has a PoC/LGBT character? 
I wish certain authors would have diverse characters because these are the ones writing books I’m actually going to read. 
And I wish bestselling artists would because no matter what their next book going to be about, it would get many readers and a lot of publicity. 
Can you imagine what it would have been like for PoC and LGBT to have their group represented as one of the trio in Harry Potter? Or even just make Dumbledore openly and obviously gay? 
This is what we need. It’s not that the public isn’t aware such people exists, but they are never in the mainstream media. Correct me if I’m wrong, but seems to me this is what all those PoC justice posts are preaching. 
And best selling authors are the main streams of books, so we want them to include these characters. 

Seriously? Do you honestly believe that bestselling books are anointed and raised up by some divine hand? Like THE CLAW HAS CHOSEN? And for some reason the claw keeps choosing straight white cisgendered protagonists written by straight white cisgendered authors? REALLY?
Best selling authors don’t just HAPPEN to be in the mainstream media. Selling a lot of books MAKES someone a bestselling author and GETS mainstream media attention. But books are sold one at a time to readers who make choices about which books they want to support.
If you want more diversity, you have to buy more diversely.
And, look, I love me and I want everyone to read all my books all the time, but reading a book with a diverse cast written by JK Rowling or myself or any other white straight cisgendered writer isn’t the same as reading a book written by a person of color or a LGBTQ+ writer. It’s the difference between a secondary source and a primary source. But if you feel that FOR SOME REASON you can be absolutely sure that you’re not going to like a book you haven’t read because it isn’t already a bestseller, then I guess that’s you, but please, please, please don’t act like it’s some kind of positive political act.
And don’t you dare talk that way to Malinda.
 

I agree with everything Holly has said above and I admire that she said it without using the many expletives that came to my mind.
I see a lot of people watching shows/movies without diversity, reading books without diversity, and then asking for diversity in those books or those shows or those movies… 
You know, asking for diversity from creators who already showed they weren’t that interested in creating something diverse.
I think it’s important to wonder why people are drawn toward media without diversity, even when they say they want diversity. It’s partly because that’s the media that’s pushed, of course, but there is diverse media to be found, and there are so many people choosing not to go looking. Why do people think this way about the diverse media that’s there?
It’s very hard to believe anyone saying they want one thing, while they show you they want something else.

hollyblack:

ivegotthekittens:

malindalo:

From today on Twitter: I often see “I wish [bestselling writer] would include POC/LGBT characters!” But There are other writers who do this. Support them.

So, you’re suggesting I read books by authors I do not like, and/or that deals with subjects I am not interested in, simply because it has a PoC/LGBT character? 

I wish certain authors would have diverse characters because these are the ones writing books I’m actually going to read. 

And I wish bestselling artists would because no matter what their next book going to be about, it would get many readers and a lot of publicity. 

Can you imagine what it would have been like for PoC and LGBT to have their group represented as one of the trio in Harry Potter? Or even just make Dumbledore openly and obviously gay? 

This is what we need. It’s not that the public isn’t aware such people exists, but they are never in the mainstream media. Correct me if I’m wrong, but seems to me this is what all those PoC justice posts are preaching. 

And best selling authors are the main streams of books, so we want them to include these characters. 

Seriously? Do you honestly believe that bestselling books are anointed and raised up by some divine hand? Like THE CLAW HAS CHOSEN? And for some reason the claw keeps choosing straight white cisgendered protagonists written by straight white cisgendered authors? REALLY?

Best selling authors don’t just HAPPEN to be in the mainstream media. Selling a lot of books MAKES someone a bestselling author and GETS mainstream media attention. But books are sold one at a time to readers who make choices about which books they want to support.

If you want more diversity, you have to buy more diversely.

And, look, I love me and I want everyone to read all my books all the time, but reading a book with a diverse cast written by JK Rowling or myself or any other white straight cisgendered writer isn’t the same as reading a book written by a person of color or a LGBTQ+ writer. It’s the difference between a secondary source and a primary source. But if you feel that FOR SOME REASON you can be absolutely sure that you’re not going to like a book you haven’t read because it isn’t already a bestseller, then I guess that’s you, but please, please, please don’t act like it’s some kind of positive political act.

And don’t you dare talk that way to Malinda.

 

I agree with everything Holly has said above and I admire that she said it without using the many expletives that came to my mind.

I see a lot of people watching shows/movies without diversity, reading books without diversity, and then asking for diversity in those books or those shows or those movies… 

You know, asking for diversity from creators who already showed they weren’t that interested in creating something diverse.

I think it’s important to wonder why people are drawn toward media without diversity, even when they say they want diversity. It’s partly because that’s the media that’s pushed, of course, but there is diverse media to be found, and there are so many people choosing not to go looking. Why do people think this way about the diverse media that’s there?

It’s very hard to believe anyone saying they want one thing, while they show you they want something else.

letmedrawsomething:

Kamy Glass from the Lynburn’s Legacy by sarahreesbrennan
I tried to do something in natazilla's way…but she is far too good

Hey there lil cutie with your pink tights rocking that blouse. ;)

letmedrawsomething:

Kamy Glass from the Lynburn’s Legacy by sarahreesbrennan

I tried to do something in natazilla's way…but she is far too good

Hey there lil cutie with your pink tights rocking that blouse. ;)