LONCON SCHEDULE

As I pack for Texas and RWA, I remember I have not yet shared the deets for my next convention, Loncon, here in London! (So little travel, huzzah!)

And girl, look at these panels.

Fresh Beasts

Thursday 15:00 - 16:30

YA writes seem particuarly keen on supernatural monsters. Have we mined out the traditional ones — the Vampires, demons and zombies? What fresh angles would breathe new afterlife into them? Or do we need a whole slew of fresh beasts to keep the reader’s interest?

Ellen Datlow, Tom Pollock, Sarah Rees Brennan, V. E. Schwab, Oisin McGann 

The Exceptional Girl Warrior

Friday 10:00 - 11:00

Some female warriors represent the norm in their fantasy or science fictional societies and are expected to train and fight alongside their men. Others are “exceptions”, who need to battle the prejudice of their colleagues just as much as their enemies. Panelists will discuss female fighters of every kind, taking examples both from real life and fiction. What are the strengths and weaknesses of the characters under discussion? How has representation of female warriors changed over time? How does the author’s treatment of these characters vary by genre if at all?

Elisabeth Waters (M), John Dodd, Kate Elliott, Sarah Maas, Sarah Rees Brennan

Teen Romance

Friday 15:00 - 16:30

Romance is in the air! Authors discuss the trend of weaving romantic entanglements into young adult literature. From true love to pining for that special someone, authors tackle the thorny subject of love, sex, and the supernatural—not to mention the fateful first kiss. What is it about a supernatural love interest that leaves mere mortals a distant second? Is there a discernible difference in how teen romance is handled between SF/F and its peer genres? And how far is too far when writing teen romance?

Mary Anne Mohanraj (M), Amie Kaufman , Mary Turzillo, Sarah Rees Brennan, Darlene Marshall

These Are Not the Elves You’re Looking For

Sunday 18:00 - 19:00

To what extent do modern fantasy novels play on readers’ familiarity - and fatigue - with genre tropes and conventions? For example, Andrzej Sapkowski, Justina Robson and Raymond E Feist have all created worlds in which the traditional Tolkienian model of benevolent, wiser-than-thou elves is challenged in various ways. Is deconstruction a new trend, or has genre fantasy been doing it for decades? How do recent debates about the cultural specificity of the English-language fantastic, and the lack of relevance of this aesthetic for audiences outside North America and the UK, affect our views of these issues?

Kate Heartfield (M), Ana Grilo, Stanislaw Krawczyk, Sarah Rees Brennan, Patrick Rothfuss

How fancy am I, fancying with these fancy people? I am VERY much looking forward to Lonconing it up!

Turn of the Story, Part 10

1st: This is, um, not the last part of the story. It, um, ran overlong again. The next part is the last!

2nd: I would not usually post on a Saturday, but this is a special Saturday. This is Kelly’s birthday! Happy birthday, sweet Kelly: without you none of this would be.

3rd: I hope you guys enjoy!

http://sarahtales.livejournal.com/216432.html

mismatchedreeding

mismatchedreeding:

Elliot from Turn of the Strory a FREE online short story by Sarah Rees Brennan.

Since there is only more chapter left before September when Wings in the Morning will come out I’ll be posting more fan art and thoughts to celebrate the grouchiest kid in magic land :)

ETA: The background just wasn’t working for me so changed it to something cleaner. Thoughts?

I think they are both extremely beautiful (I specially like Elliot’s hair and the way he is both reading and rocking out) and I am the luckiest girl in luckyland.

oceanicappeal
oceanicappeal:

He knew what was wrong with him: awkward, spiky, occasionally cruel, inherently unlovable, all of that. But he’d always had a certain intense belief in what he could do: write treaties, end wars, throw all the knives away, make people listen to him, accomplish whatever he wanted. - Sarah Rees Brennan, The Turn of the Story

Aw, what a magnificent side-eye. I love art that conveys personality, and I feel very lucky. ;)

oceanicappeal:

He knew what was wrong with him: awkward, spiky, occasionally cruel, inherently unlovable, all of that. But he’d always had a certain intense belief in what he could do: write treaties, end wars, throw all the knives away, make people listen to him, accomplish whatever he wanted. - Sarah Rees Brennan, The Turn of the Story

Aw, what a magnificent side-eye. I love art that conveys personality, and I feel very lucky. ;)

Are you guys ready…

… for the next part of the Turn of the Story?

' The shop only stayed open until four on Saturdays. Elliot was going to have to go back to his house and his father.

Maybe he could go to Luke’s after all. Maybe Luke wouldn’t really mind.

Elliot shook his head at himself, and switched songs. The next was good, jaunty, with a clapping, swinging beat: Elliot vigorously strummed the guitar and sang at his own dumb feelings.

He looked down automatically at the touch of a hand on his: not in alarm, as Joe had tried to teach him the basics of guitar before.

When he looked down, the hand was definitely not Joe’s. Joe did not have barbed wire tattoos on his knuckles.

Elliot squawked, twisted around and brandished the electronic guitar in a threatening manner at a total stranger, some blond guy with a goatee and a few more tattoos.

“Whoa,” said the stranger. “Hi.” ‘

http://sarahtales.livejournal.com/216147.html

pocochina
  • rochester: accuses jane of bewitching his horse
  • rochester: interrogates jane about her paintings
  • rochester: leaves jane abruptly for months at a time
  • rochester: stages an engagement with a hot rich aristocrat to hurt jane's feelings
  • rochester: dresses up as a fortune teller to mess with jane's head
  • rochester: neglects to tell jane about the murderous insane wife living in his attic
  • rochester: wait jane why are you leaving
  • Word up.
  • http: //sarahtales.livejournal.com/193457.html